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How to Use the Wind Blast Effect in Adobe Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, we will learn how to use the popular wind blast effect to create a neoclassic style poster template in Adobe Photoshop. 

What you will learn in this poster template tutorial:

  • How to set up Guides in Photoshop
  • How to crop an image using Layer Masks in Photoshop
  • How to create a wind blast effect in Photoshop

What You Will Need

You’ll need access to Adobe Photoshop; if you don’t have the software, you can download a trial from the Adobe website. You’ll also need these resources:

Download the image and install the font, and you are ready to start! Advertisement

1. Setting Up a New Photoshop File

Step 1

In Photoshop, go to File > New. Name the document Melodias PosterSet the Width to 1270 px and Height to 1600 px. Set the Resolution to 72 Pixels/Inch. Click OK.

Create a new Photoshop file

Step 2

Press Command-R to bring up the rules around the document. Head over to View > New Guide. On the New Guide window option, select Horizontal and set the guide to 70 px. Click OK.

Do the same for the other sides of the document by subtracting 70 px from the final size. To activate and deactivate the guides, press Command-;.

Add guides to the document

Step 3

On the Layers panel, click on the Create a new Fill or Adjustment Layer > Solid Color. Select a black color and click OK.

Create a new Fill with a black color

2. How to Create a Soft, Blended Background

Step 1

To create a colored background, we need to create a new layer and create color stamps. Press Shift-Command-N. Name the layer Background. Click OK.

Select the Brush Tool (B) from the toolbar. Right-click on the document to change the settings. Set the Size to 600 px and the Hardness to 0%.

Create a new layer

Step 2

Click on the foreground color and set the color to #af00d0. Click OK. 

Stamp over the document, trying to concentrate on the outer edges of the page. Repeat this step using these other two colors: #00e4f4 and #0d43ff.

Using the brush tool stamp over the documents with different colors

Step 3

While selecting the Background layer on the Layer panel,head over to Filter > Blur > Motion Blur.  On the Motion Blur option window, set the Angle to 90 and the Distance to 1625. Click OK.

We want the background to be soft. On the layer panel, lower the Opacity to 50%.

Apply the motion blur effect and lower the opacity of the layer

3. How to Close-Crop an Image Using Layer Masks

Step 1

Drag the Greek God image into the Photoshop document. When dragging an image into a document in Photoshop, it should automatically fit the document. If it doesn’t fit, press Command-T to Transform. Head over to the Options bar and set the Width and Height to 23.82%. Press Enter.

Drag the Greek God image onto the Photoshop file

Step 2

On the Layers panel, make sure you have the Greek God layerselected. Head over to the bottom of the panel and add a Layer Mask. The Layer Mask should be selected automatically; if not, make sure you are working on the Layer Mask.

Layer Masks allow us to hide and reveal parts of an image instead of completely deleting them. You will notice in the next steps that parts of the thumbnail will change from white to black and vice versa. The black represents hidden parts, and the white parts are the revealed sections. You can change this on the foreground/background color. 

Add a layer  mask to the Greek God layer

Step 3

Select the Magic Wand Tool (W) from the toolbar. The Magic Wand Tool is a useful tool when there’s a strong contrast between the foreground and background of the image. For instance, this image has a strong bokeh, which makes it easy to select. Select the green parts of the image by clicking on the document. If you need to add more sections to the selection, hold down Shift and click to select. Press Command-I to Invert the Layer Mask or hide the selection, followed by Command-D to Deselect.   

Don’t worry if the Magic Wand Tool (W) selects part of the foreground, in this case the statue. We will be using the Brush Tool (B) in the next step to work on the details.

Using the Magic Wand Tool select the background of the image

Step 4

Select the Brush Tool (B) from the toolbar. Right-click on the document and set the brush Size to 150 px and the Hardness to 100%.

For this tutorial, we will be using only the head of the statue and the beard. Using the Brush Tool (B), start brushing off the chest and neck areas. 

Using the brush tool hide the neck and chest area of the image

Step 5

If the Magic Wand Tool (W) selected parts of the foreground, this is the step to fix it. While selecting the Brush Tool (W), press the X key. This shortcut will change the foreground color from black to white. 

Brush over the areas that are hidden to reveal them. Use the X key to go back and forth to switch the foreground colors.

Using the brush tool finesse parts of the image

4. How to Create the Wind Blast Effect

Step 1

Duplicate the Greek God layer by pressing Command-J. Hide the original layer by clicking on the eye icon. We will be working on the duplicated layer. Make sure that you are selecting the Smart Object thumbnail and not the Layer Mask.

To create the wind blast effect, we need to rotate the image. Press Command-T and rotate the image to a 90-degree angle. Press Shift as you rotate for an even rotation. Press Enter to apply. 

We need to rotate the layer because the direction of the Wind effect goes only from side to side and not from top to bottom. 

Rotate the Greek God layer

Step 2

Head over to Filter > Stylize > Wind > Stagger. In the Wind option window, set the Method to Stagger and the Direction to From the Right. Click OK.

We need to apply this effect several times. We can do so by pressing Command-F, which will repeat the last effect. You can repeat the effect as many times you like—I repeated it 10 times. 

Apply the wind effect and apply the same effect multiple times

Step 3

Before rotating the layer back to its original place, we need to rasterize the layer and the smart filters. If we neglect this part, the filter will be reapplied on the image in its original place. Right-click on the layer and select Rasterize Layer. 

Press Command-T and hold down Shift to rotate the image back to its original place. Press Enter to apply.

Rasterize the layer and rotate to its original position

Step 4

Activate the original Greek God layer. Select the Brush Tool (B) from the toolbar. Right-click on the document to set the brush. Select the Oil Pastel Large brush. I’ve found this is the best brush to use to reveal and hide the Wind effect. 

Set the brush tool

Step 5

Select the Layer Mask on the duplicate Greek God layer. Using the Brush Tool (B), start revealing parts of the image. In this case, let’s start by working on the left side of the image. 

Use the following shortcuts to make this step easier. Use to change the foreground color, to reveal and hide parts of the image. To adjust the size of the brush, press [ to decrease and [ to increase the size. 

Using the brush tool hide and reveal parts of the image

Step 6

In my case, I want to reveal only a few parts of the effect over the original Greek God layer. There is no right or wrong in this step—feel free to put your own spin on the design! 

Below, you can take a look at the final composition I have. On the right side, I’ve shown you the Wind effect layer alone so you can see how much of it I hid and revealed. 

On the left is the final image composition of the two layers On the right is the Wind Blast effect layer shown by itself

Step 7

To neutralize the color of the image, we will add an Adjustment Layer. Head over to the Layers panel, and select Adjustment Layer > Black & White. 

We want the Adjustment Layer to only be applied to the statue. Select both Greek God layers and drag them towards the Group button. Right-click on the Black and White Adjustment Layer and select Create Clipping Mask.

Use the Properties panel to tweak the colors. I tweaked the Reds to 300 and the Yellows to -50 to add contrast. Feel free to do your own version!

Add a Black and White adjustment layer and create a Clipping Mask

5. How to Create a Colorful Stroke

Step 1

Create a new layer by pressing Shift-Command-N. Name the layer Stroke. Click OK. Move the layer under the grouped Greek God layers. 

Create a new layer

Step 2

On the toolbar, select the Brush Tool (B). Right-click and change the brush to a circular brush. Set the brush Size to 500 and the Hardness to 0. 

Use the following color codes to brush over the layer: #f7af08#f502fe#35b5f0#8566fb, and #1be5e9. I am hiding the Greek God layers so you can see the result. It doesn’t to be exact—put your own spin on it! 

Using the brush tool create a colorful composition

Step 3

Head over to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur. In the Gaussian Blur option window, set the Radius to 150 pixels. Click OK.

Apply the Gaussian Blur filter effect to soften the layer

Step 4

Reveal the grids we created at the beginning of this tutorial by pressing Command-;.

On the toolbar, select the Rectangle Tool (U). Draw a rectangle to fit inside the grid. Head over to the Options bar, and set the Stroke to 50 pt. 

Using the rectangle tool creae a rectangle around the perimeter of the document

Step 5

Head over to the Layers panel. Right-click on the Rectangle layer and select Rasterize Layer. Press down Command and click on the rectangle thumbnail. This will create a selection of the object. Select the Stroke layer and click on the Add Layer Mask button. Delete the Rectangle layer.

Create a Layer Mask out of the rectangle we created

Step 6

Now we can resize the stroke. Press Command-T to Transform. Hold down Option-Shift while you resize to evenly resize the rectangle while using the center as the main point. Alternatively, you can head over to the Options bar and set the Width and Height to 60%. Feel free to set it to a different size.Press Enter. 

Resize the rectangle stroke

Step 7

Remember you can always tweak the colors and brightness by adding an Adjustment Layer in the Layers panelFor instance, below I added a Brightness/Contrast, and I changed the Contrast value to 100. I also added a Hue/Saturation and set the Hue value to 125. 

If you want these layers applied only to the Stroke layer, right-click > Create Clipping Mask.

Add adjustment layers to tweak the colors and brightness

6. How to Use the Text Tool

Step 1

On the Tools panel, select the Text Tool (T). I used white text to contrast with the background. The typeface I used is US Bill.

Bring up the Tools panel by going to Type > Panels > Character Panel. Below are the details I added with the type size and specific font weight on separate layers.

LA LIGA PRESENTA:
MELODIAS
NEOCLÁSICAS

(US Bill, Slant and ExtraBold Slant, Size: 46 pt and 140 pt, Tracking: 50 pt, Leading for the second line is 120 pt and for the third line is 150 pt. I encourage you to play with the leading as it is a great exercise to understand legibility. Select a text line and press Option-Up arrow or Option-Down arrow to add or decrease the leading).

+
MEXICO
GUADALAJARA
ECATEPEC
GUADALAJARA
PUEBLA
JUÁREZ
TIJUANA
LEÓN
ZAPOPAN
MONTERREY

(US Bill, Slant, Size: 21 pt, Tracking: 50 pt, Leading: Auto).

+
FIESTA DE
LANZAMIENTO
EN VIVO
09.02
—28.02
2019

(US Bill, Slant, Size: 45 pt,Tracking: 50 pt, Leading: 38 pt).

I’ve placed the three text blurbs opposite each other. You will notice that they create a triangle, this is important to make the viewer’s eyes jump from one point of information to the other. We are not only creating tension but also visual balance. 

Add text to the composition

Step 2

The title is placed over the stroke and the image. You will notice that this portion of the poster template seems busy and too mixed up. Let’s make the text jump out. Right-click on the title layer and select Blending Options.

Select the Drop Shadow style. Set the Blending Mode to Multiply, the Opacity to 40%, the Angle to 120, the Distance to 13 px, the Spread to 6%, and the Size to 38 px. Under Quality, set the Contour to Half Round. Click OK.

Add a Drop Shadow effect on the main title of the composition

7. How to Save a File for Web

Head over to File > Save and save the file as you would normally. 

To save a JPEG for web file, head over to File > Save for Web or Shift-Option-Command-S. Select the file type you want to save the document in—I am choosing JPEG—and set 100 for Quality. Under Image size, you can change the pixel size of the image if you have any size constraints. 

On the bottom left-hand side, you can see a preview of the size of the file. This is useful when there are size constraints on a website and you need to lower the quality or the size of the image. 

Click on Save… to choose the location in the new window, and click on Save again.

Save the file
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How to Make Halftone Effect Patterns and Brushes in Photoshop and Illustrator

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What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, I’ll show you what halftone is and how to achieve a color halftone effect. I’ll also show you how to make your own halftone brushes.

What Is Halftone?

You might be familiar with halftone patterns being used in printing. While the pattern is essential for that specific medium, halftone patterns also give a unique look to design work. Halftone is a technique that simulates tone gradations by using dots. These dots vary in size, spacing and sometimes even shape to generate a halftone gradient effect. The closer and bigger the dots on the halftone, the darker the image is. The smaller and more spread out the dots are, the lighter the image is. When it is all put together, the halftone effect creates the illusion of gradation when seen from afar.

Nowadays, halftone is commonly used digitally to achieve a comic-book look, representing nostalgia in the digital age.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to achieve a halftone effect in Photoshop. You can apply these steps to any image of your liking to achieve a black and white halftone and color halftone. We will also take a look at how to create your own halftone brushes in Photoshop, which can help you add great details to your artwork. Lastly, we will look at how to create halftone brushes in Illustrator. This is perfect if you are getting started in the illustration world and want to develop your skill and style. 

What You Will Need

You’ll need access to Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator; if you don’t have the software, you can download a trial from the Adobe website. You’ll also need this image:

  • Headphones isolated on white background

Download the image, and when you are ready, we can dive in! Advertisement

1. How to Make a Halftone Pattern in Photoshop

First let’s jump into learning how to create a halftone effect in Photoshop. 

Step 1

Drag the Headphones isolated on white backgroundimage into Photoshop. We will convert this into a variety of halftone images to try different settings.

To achieve a color halftone in Photoshop, go to Filter > Pixelate > Color Halftone. 

drag the headphones image into adobe photoshop and apply the color halftone filter

Step 2

In the Color Halftone option window, you’ll notice the Max. Radius and Channels options. Max. Radius dictates the maximum size of the dots, which will dictate how detailed you want your image to be. The bigger the dots, the less detailed it is; the smaller the dots, the more detailed it will be. 

The Channels represent cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, and the angle these colors will get mixed in. This is to achieve specific colors and tones. The angle creates moiré effects and rosette patterns that are useful for printing when halftoning is necessary. In this tutorial, we will focus on the look of halftone effects that can be printed or used digitally as a style. 

The Color Halftone option window has default settings. Mine are set to the following: 

  • Max. Radius 8 pixels
  • Channel 1: 108
  • Channel 2: 162
  • Channel 3: 90
  • Channel 4: 45

Click OK. 

Use the default settings and click ok

In the example below, you can see that we’ve created a color halftone in Photoshop. The closer and bigger the dots are, the darker the image is, and the smaller and more spread out, the lighter the image is. The image is very textured due to the low Max. Radius. Look at the image from afar, and you’ll notice that the dots disappear, lending a tone gradation illusion. 

headphones image with the default settings halftone

Step 3

Press Command-Z to go back a step. Go to Filter > Pixelate > Color Halftone. Let’s try the halftone effect with a different Max. Radius setting:

  • Max. Radius 20 pixels
  • Channel 1: 108
  • Channel 2: 162
  • Channel 3: 90
  • Channel 4: 45

Click OK.

You’ll notice the dots are much bigger, and you can see the CMYK color mix as a scattered pattern. 

headphones image with max radius of 20

Step 4

Press Command-Z to go back a step. Go to Filter > Pixelate > Color Halftone. Let’s try the halftone effect with the same Max. Radius setting as above and changing the channels to 45:

  • Max. Radius 20 pixels
  • Channel 1: 45
  • Channel 2: 45
  • Channel 3: 45
  • Channel 4: 45

Click OK.

You’ll notice the dots are the same size but the angles are lined up on a grid, creating a neat pattern. 

headphones image with all channels at 45 degrees

Step 5

Press Command-Z to go back a step.

Another way of achieving a halftone effect is by using the bitmap option. With the bitmap option, you can create a black and white halftone effect and use different halftone shapes. This technique will maintain the edges of the image as a cookie-cutter to create the halftone pattern. In order to access the bitmap option, we need to turn the image to grayscale. 

Head over to Image > Mode > Grayscale, followed by Image > Mode > Bitmap.

convert the headphones image to grayscale

Step 6

In the Bitmap option window, set the Output to 72 Pixels/Inch. Under Method, Use: Halftone Screen and click OK. 

convert the image into bitmap under method use halftone screen

In the Halftone Screen option window, set the Frequency to 3 Lines/Inch, the Angle to 45 degrees, and Shape to Round. Click OK.

You’ll notice in the image below that compared to the Halftone Effect, this instead cuts out the dots on the edge. 

set the frequency to 3 angle to 45 and shape to round Click ok

Step 7

Let’s say you want to achieve a different kind of halftone effect. Press Command-Z to go back a step.

Go to Image > Mode > Bitmap. In the Bitmap option window, set the Output to 72 Pixels/Inch. Under Method, Use: Halftone Screen and click OK. 

Let’s use the same settings, but this time change the Shape to Line. Click OK. By the traditional definition, this isn’t exactly halftone because it is not composed of dots, but it has the same idea. We are creating a halftone gradient with the lines.

Headphones image with the shape option set to line

2. How to Make Halftone Brushes in Photoshop

You can also create this halftone effect in Photoshop with brushes. Halftone Photoshop brushes will help you create a halftone texture in your designs.

Step 1

Go to File > New and create a new file named Halftone brush. 

Set the Width and Height to 1500 Pixels, Resolution to 72 Pixels/Inch, and click Create.

create a new photoshop file

Step 2

Select the Brush Tool (B) from the toolbar. Right-click on the document to open the brush options. 

Select the Hard Round Brush, and set the Size to 500 px and the Hardness to 25%. The hardness will help spread out the brush, and this will translate into a halftone gradient in which the dots vary in size as they spread out.

select the hard round brush and set the size to 500 px and hardness to 25

Step 3

Click once on the document to create one brush stroke.

Head over to Filter > Pixelate > Color Halftone. Set the Max. Radius to 20 Pixels and all the Channels to 45. Click OK.

click once on the document and apply the color halftone filter

Step 4

Go to Edit > Define Brush Preset. In the Brush Name option window, set the Name to Halftone Brush. Click OK.

select the define brush preset option under edit to create a new brush

Step 5

Now you can use the new brush by brushing strokes on the document. 

brush is ready to be used

Head over to Window > Brush Settings to open the Brush Settings panel. Here, you can change the settings to achieve different looks. Change the Spacing to 1% to achieve a smoother transition and to 95% to separate the strokes. Now your brush is ready to use. 

open the brush settings to modify brush options

3. How to Make Halftone Brushes in Adobe Illustrator

Now let’s learn how to create a halftone effect in Illustrator with Illustrator brushes.

Step 1

Open Illustrator, and head over to File > New. 

In the New Document window, select the Print tab. Select the Letter size blank preset. Name the file Halftone, and set the Units to Centimeters and Orientation to Horizontal. Click Create. 

create a new illustrator file

Step 2

For this brush, we will create a halftone pattern in Illustrator from scratch and later build up to a composition.

Select the Ellipse Tool (L) from the toolbar. Click on the artboard to open the Ellipse option window. Set the Width and Height to 1 cm. Click OK.

Set the Fill color to Black. 

Create a second Ellipse, this time setting the Width and Height to 0.3 cm. Click OK. 

create a 1cm circle and a 03 cm circle

Step 3

Select both circles. Open the Align panel by going to Window > Align. Select the Horizontal Align Center button. 

Select the Blend Tool (W) from the toolbar. Click on any of the circles followed by the other circle. This will fill the gap between the two objects by creating a number of steps. 

use the blend tool to create steps between the two

Step 4

To alter the number of steps between the two objects, double-click on the Blend Tool button on the toolbar.

In the Blend Options window, check the Preview box. Set the Spacing to Specified Steps, andset the number to 9. Click OK.

set the specified steps to 9

Step 5

Head over to Object > Expand. In the Expand option window, select Object and Fill. Click OK. This will convert steps into objects. You’ll know you’ve done so when the line from the Blend Tool running across the steps has disappeared. 

Duplicate the object to the right by holding Shift-Option and dragging. Shift will keep the object at the same axis, and Option will Duplicate the object.

Select the Blend Tool (W) from the toolbar. Click on one set of circles followed by the second set. This will create steps to fill in the gap.

Expand the object and duplicate Use the blend tool to fill the gap

Step 6

Go to Object > Expand and click OK in the Expand option window. 

In order to create a brush, we need to create a tile that is able to multiply. Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a square that covers the center of the outermost circle from left to right. Below, I’ve colored the rectangle in cyan for you to see.

create a square that covers all the circles making sure each corner is placed on each circles center

Step 7

While selecting the circles and the square, press Command-7 to Make a Clipping Mask. 

create a clipping mask

Step 8

Hold down Shift-Option on your keyboard and drag to the right three times to create a tile. 

duplicate the tile a few times

Step 9

Open the Brushes panel by going to Window > Brushes.

Select all three tiles and drag into the Brushes panel. In the New Brush window, select Art Brush. Click OK.

open the brushes panel and drag the tile into the panel

Step 10

On the Art Brush Options window, Name the brush Halftone. Set the Width to Fixed and Brush Scale Options to Stretch to Fit Stroke Length. Click OK.

create a brush with the tile

Step 11   

To apply the brush on a path, select the Pen Tool (P) from the toolbar. Create a line on the artboard. Set the Stroke color to Black. 

On the Brushes panel, select the Halftone brush we created. 

using the pen tool draw a line and choose the pattern as a stroke

Step 12

You can control the size of the pattern by opening the Strokes panel. Go to Window > Strokes. On the Strokes panel, set the Stroke Weight to 0.75 pt. 

control the size by going to the stroke panel and changing the weight

Step 13

Let’s apply this halftone brush pattern to a circle. 

First, head to the Brushes panel and double-click on the halftone brush to change the settings. In the Art Brush Options window, set the Colorization Method to Hue Shift. 

change the method to hue shift to apply color to the pattern

Step 14

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create an ellipse on the artboard—any size is fine. Set the Fill color to 40% Cyan. 

Select the Brush Tool (B) from the toolbar. Draw a curve on the bottom left quadrant portion of the circle. 

Set the Stroke on the Strokes panel to 0.5 pt. Set the Stroke color to a darker cyan. Position the stroke on the ellipse. 

create an ellipse and a curve to create the illusion of shadow under the ellipse

Select the ellipse and press Shift-Command-] to bring the shape Forward. Select both the ellipse and the stroke and press Command-7 to Make a Clipping Mask. 

Select the ellipse again and set the Fill to 40% Cyan. 

This is great to add subtle shadows to your illustration.

create a clipping mask
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How to Create a Photo to Art Text Effect Photoshop Action

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What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, you will learn how to create a Photoshop action to transform a photo into an art text effect. I will explain everything in so much detail that everyone can create it, even those who have just opened Photoshop for the first time.

The photo effect shown above is the one I will show you how to create in this tutorial. If you would like to create the even more advanced typography Photoshop effect shown below, using just a single click and in only a few minutes, then check out my Typography 7 Photoshop Action.

Typography Photoshop Action
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How to Emboss Text in Illustrator

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What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps, you will learn how to make text look embossed in Adobe Illustrator.

For starters, you will learn how to create a simple background of your text design. Next, you will learn how to add some text and easily adjust its appearance. Moving on, you will learn how to emboss text in Illustrator. Finally, you will learn how to transfer the properties of your embossed text to other pieces of text.

What You Will Need:

You will need the following resource in order to complete this 3D text effect:

1. How to Create the Background

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width box and 680 in the height box, and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi), and then click Create Document.

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and focus on your toolbar. Remove the color from the stroke, and then select the fill and set its color to R=124 G=109 B=254. Create a shape the size of your artboard (850 x 680 px) and place it as shown in the following image. Now that the background is prepared, let’s learn how to make text look embossed in Illustrator.

rectangle tool background

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2. How to Add the Text

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Knicknack font and set the size to 130 px.

Click on the artboard and add the “EMBOSSED” piece of text. Set its color to white (R=255 G=255 B=255). Place it as shown in the first image.

Using the same tool and text attributes, add the “TEXT” and “EFFECT” pieces of text and place them as shown in the second image.

type tool text

Step 2

Select the “EMBOSSED” text, focus on the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches), and click that [None] swatch to remove the white text color.

Move to the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance) and add a new fill using the Add New Fill button. Select that new fill and set its color to R=97 G=83 B=242.

text color appearance panel

3. How to Emboss Text in Illustrator

Step 1

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a second fill and select it. Change the color to R=104 G=90 B=253 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK. Don’t forget to check that top-middle reference point (highlighted in the following image).

add new fill transform effect

Step 2

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a third fill and select it. Change the color to R=142 G=127 B=254 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK. Remember to check the top-middle reference point.

add new fill embossed text

Step 3

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a fourth fill and select it. Change the color to R=136 G=121 B=254 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below in the left window and click OK. Remember to check the top-middle reference point. Go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below in the right window and click OK. This time, remember to check the bottom-middle reference point.

add new fill embossed text

Step 4

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a fifth fill and select it. Change the color to R=124 G=109 B=254 and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below in the left window and click OK. Remember to check the top-middle reference point. Go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown below in the right window and click OK. This time, remember to check the bottom-middle reference point.

add new fill embossed text

Step 5

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Be sure that the top fill is still selected and go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow. Enter the attributes shown below and click OK.

add new fill embossed text

Step 6

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a new fill and drag it to the bottom of the panel. Select it, set the color to R=97 G=83 B=252, and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown in the top-left window (in the following image), click OK, and then apply the other two Drop Shadow effects shown below.

drop shadow embossed text

Step 7

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a new fill and drag it to the bottom of the panel. Select it, set the color to R=97 G=83 B=252, and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and click OK.

drop shadow embossed text

Step 8

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a new fill and drag it to the bottom of the panel. Select it, set the color to R=97 G=83 B=252, and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and click OK.

drop shadow embossed text

Step 9

Make sure that your “EMBOSSED” text stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel.

Add a new fill and drag it to the bottom of the panel. Select it, set the color to R=97 G=83 B=252, and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the attributes shown in the following image, click OK, and this will be your embossed text.

drop shadow embossed text

Step 10

Focus on the Layers panel, expand your layer, and use those target icons to easily apply the Appearance attributes used for your “EMBOSSED” text to the other two pieces of text. Target icons are the little round icons displayed at the far right of each individual layer or shape.

Hold the Alt button on your keyboard, click the target icon that stands for your “EMBOSSED” piece of text, and then drag it onto the target icon that stands for your “TEXT” and “EFFECT” pieces of text.

copy paste embossed text effect

Congratulations! Your Embossed Text Is Ready!

Here is how your embossed text should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your 3D text in the comments section.

how to make text look embossed in illustrator
Final product image

How to Make a Photo Collage in Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In this tutorial, you will learn how to make a photo collage in Photoshop. I will explain everything in so much detail that everyone can create it, even those who have just opened Photoshop for the first time.

What You’ll Need

To recreate the design above, you will need the following resources:

1. Let’s Get Started

First, open the photo that you want to work with. To open your photo, go to File > Open, choose your photo, and click Open. Now, before we get started, just check a couple of things:

  1. Your photo should be in RGB Color mode, 8 Bits/Channel. To check this, go to Image > Mode.
  2. For best results, your photo size should be 3000–4000 px wide/high. To check this, go to Image > Image Size.
  3. Your photo should be the Background layer. If it is not, go to Layer > New > Background from Layer.
checking image size and mode

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2. How to Select the Subject

Step 1

In this section, we are going to make a selection of our subject and then copy the subject to a separate layer. Choose the Quick Selection Tool (W), and select the background of the photo. Use the Shift-Alt buttons on your keyboard to add or subtract some areas from the selection. After you’ve made a perfect selection, press Control-Shift-I to invert the selection.

making selection

Step 2

Now go to Select > Modify > Smooth and set the Sample Radius to 5 px. Then, go to Select > Modify > Contract andset Contract By to 2 px. After that, go to Select > Modify > Feather and set the Feather Radius to 2 px as shown below:

modifying selection

Step 3

Press Control-J on your keyboard to create a new layer using the selection. Then, name this layer Subject.

creating new layer using selection

3. How to Add the Background

In this section, we are going to add the background. Select the Background layer, go to File > Place Embedded, select thebackground from the link, and click Place. Then, set the Width and Height of the layer to 70.62% as shown below, and name this layer Background.

placing background

4. How to Make a Photo Collage

Step 1

In this section, we are going to make a photo collage. Select the Subject layer, set the foreground color to #ff0000, and choose the Rectangle Tool (U). Then, click anywhere inside the canvas to create a rectangle and set the Width and Height to 1200 px.

creating rectangle

Step 2

Now choose the Move Tool (V), and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

positioning layer

Step 3

Press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to 15° as shown below:

transforming layer

Step 4

Now press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 1 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 5

Press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to -30°.

transforming-layer

Step 6

Now name this layer Rectangle 2.

naming layer

Step 7

Now press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 2 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 8

Press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to -30° as shown below:

transforming layer

Step 9

Now name this layer Rectangle 3.

naming layer

Step 10

Press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 3 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 11

Now name this layer Rectangle 4.

naming layer

Step 12

Press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 4 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 13

Press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to -15° as shown below:

transforming-layer

Step 14

Now name this layer Rectangle 5.

naming layer

Step 15

Press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 5 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 16

Now press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to -60°:

transforming layer

Step 17

Name this layer Rectangle 6.

naming layer

Step 18

Now press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 6 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 19

Press Control-T on your keyboard to transform this layer and set the Angle of the layer to 30°:

transforming layer

Step 20

Now name this layer Rectangle 7.

naming layer

Step 21

Press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just below the Rectangle 7 layer in the Layers panel. Then, choose the Move Tool (V) and click and drag anywhere inside the canvas to position the rectangle as shown below:

duplicating layer

Step 22

Now name this layer Rectangle 8.

naming layer

Step 23

Select the Subject layer and drag it just above the Rectangle 1 layer in the Layers panel. Then, press Control-Alt-G on your keyboard to create a clipping mask. After that, name this layer R_1_Subject.

creating clipping mask

Step 24

Now press Control-J on your keyboard to duplicate this layer and drag it just above the Rectangle 2 layer in the Layers panel. Then, press Control-Alt-G to create a clipping mask and name this layer R_2_Subject.

duplicating layer

Step 25

Repeat this process to create clipping masks for the remaining rectangle layers.

repeating process

Step 26

Now Right-click on the Rectangle 1 layer, choose Blending Options, and use the settings below:

adjusting blending options

Step 27

Repeat the previous step for all the remaining rectangle layers.

repeating previous step

Step 28

Now you can rearrange the layers in the Layers panel or reposition them using the Move Tool (V) to avoid slicing through the specific areas of the subject. Then, rename the layers accordingly.

arranging layers

Step 29

Select the R_1_Subject layer and Shift-click on the Rectangle 8 layer to select all layers between. Then, go to Layer > New > Group from Layers to create a new group from the selected layers and name it Photo Collage.

creating new group from layers

Step 30

Now press Control-A on your keyboard to make a selection of the canvas. Choose the Move Tool (V), and click on Align Vertical Center and then on Align Horizontal Center to align the layer group both vertically and horizontally.

aligning layers group

You Made It!

Congratulations, you have succeeded! You have learned how to make a photo collage in Photoshop. Here is our final result:

final result
70s retro effects

A Look at Graphic Trends That Define the 70s (Retro Fonts, Text Effects, and More!)

Let’s take a trip back in time! In this article, we’ll explore the groovy and psychedelic decade by looking at some iconic vintage 70s fonts!

70s retro effects
70s Retro Effects

The 1970s were filled with many social movements and cultural trends that greatly influenced graphic design. People wanted to express themselves as extravagantly as possible through music, fashion, and art. The hippy, disco, and punk movements were just a few of the trends that defined this iconic decade and made an impact in the visual world. 

Fonts were a big part of this decade as designers were moving from the International Typographic Style that reigned in the 50s and part of the 60s. Hand-drawn retro fonts in the 70s were flowy and freeform. There was a big boom of 70s lettering fonts for advertising. Disco fonts were inspired by iconic neon lights. 

New ways of typesetting were introduced, like the Letraset and the Visual Graphics PhotoTypositor. These two techniques allowed for an easier and more economical way to transfer type. Designers had more freedom to experiment with spacing and scaling.

Letraset introduced the dry transfer technique and could hold more detail. Many of the most recognizable fonts from the 1970s came from Letraset designer Colin Brignall: Aachen Bold, Italia, Octopuss, Superstar, and many more.

The Visual Graphics PhotoTypositor used large negative film strips that contained characters next to each other. The user simply lined up the character they wanted to be printed with a lens, and it was later projected onto photographic paper. This allowed for custom adjustments to the spacing of the characters. The unit also had different distortion lenses that made words take on different shapes. 

Punk Rock Music Event Flyer
Punk Rock Music Event Flyer

Printing moved from letterpress to offset as darkrooms were becoming more and more sophisticated. It was normal to use film exposures to modify artworks and create chokes and spreads for trapping. Many devices were invented to alter type optically. For instance, one could take a solid typeface and create outlines, inlines, and interesting perspectives.

Characteristics

The 70s were characterized by multiple social movements and trends. One thing was for sure, the visuals were pushed to extremes—some might say tasteless, and some might say tasteful. Let’s take a look at a few characteristics:

  • Printing allowed for the use of photography, and advertisers wanted to go all out and use as much color as possible. 
  • Colorful illustrations became almost essential in every piece of design. We can see some Art Nouveau appear with the intricate psychedelic style
  • Designers had a lot more control when it came to typesetting. Experimentations with spacing and distorted type took off very quickly. Groovy fonts included swashes, another reference to Art Nouveau. These organic shapes were added at the end of capital letters and ball terminals. 
  • Graphic design became a weapon of protest. Many political protest groups made ways to draw type designs by hand, resulting in some really groovy 70s fonts.  
  • The most iconic element in this decade was type design. Groovy music inspired 70s bubble fonts. Thick and curvy hand-drawn scripts carried on from the 60s. 70s disco fonts were inspired by neon lights. Punk rock inspired a revolution with collaged characters and distorted sans serifs. 
  • The gay pride movement introduced its iconic flag in the late 70s. This inspired designers to use many different colors in their design because it represented a positive and happy vibe. 

For more funky 70s font effects, check out the high-quality assets over at GraphicRiver and Envato Elements. Happy designing!

70s Swashes

Swashes were ubiquitous in the vintage 70s fonts. A swash is a typographical flourish that exaggerated serifs and terminals on a character. Swashes were revived in the 70s as a tribute to Art Nouveau, the movement that inspired flourishes in every aspect of the design world. Advertisement

Periwinkle

This 70s groovy font is a revival of the charm of the 60s and 70s. The curly ends and rounded edges take us back to our childhood. Periwinkle comes with a full set of alternate swashes for capitals and a few for lowercase characters. 

Periwinkle
Periwinkle

Swashington

This serif font mixed with evocative swashes and ligatures will take you right back to the 70s style. This font has an extensive library of characters and options to experiment with. With over 270 discretionary ligatures, you’ll be sure to find something that works! 

Swashington
Swashington

70s Groovy Fonts

Illustration made way for hand-drawn groovy fonts in the 70s. Psychedelic and funky 70s style fonts weren’t properly portrayed with your typical serif and sans serif, so designers started breaking the mold. They also had that ‘look at me’ quality that set them apart from normal ad campaigns. 

Flowy, smooth, bubble-like shapes were almost a direct response to the International Typographic Style of the 50s. The 70s were also exuberant and free, and hand-drawn fonts really show these qualities. 

Califunkia

This heavy, cartoonish 70s funky font is based on hand-lettered advertisements. The font includes multiple ligature options for the characters. The fun part of ligatures is mixing and matching characters—there’s always more than one perfect match! 

Califunkia
Califunkia

Greta

This fun 70s bubble font is perfect for branding. The unique set of characters comes in two variants: filled and outlined. We know outlines were a big boom in the 70s style font. 

Greta
Greta

Far Out

Far Out is a groovy 70s font that features round corners on all the characters. The set is inspired by the Flower Children of the 60s and 70s. A cool add-on? 22 hand-drawn graphics to complete your designs! 

Far Out
Far Out

Marco Valmory

This retro font is bold and fun. Groovy? Check. Funky? Check. Drop shadow? Check. With this vintage 70s font, you have the full recipe you need to complete your hip design! 

Marco Valmory
Marco Valmory

Casual 70s Script Fonts

Casual 70s script fonts were less formal fonts used in advertising throughout the 60s and 70s. Much of the influence also came from the wellness movement and the need to use appropriate fonts that weren’t flowy and free. 

Funkies

Inspired by disco, this funky 70s font is perfect for posters and album covers. It’s bold, fun, and flowy, just like the iconic decade, and it’s perfect for that fun party you’ve been meaning to throw! Retro fonts in the 70s are hard to nail, but this one is an exception: well designed, with many stylistic alternates, swashes, and ligatures for you to choose from!

Funkies disco font
Funkies

Groovy

Drop shadows made the 70s groovy fonts stand out by giving them an extra layer to pop. This groovy 70s font includes an extra extruded font version to create that extruded/drop shadow effect. It’ll save you lots of time. The font is extensive: 593 glyphs, with 21 options for each character. That’s variety!

Groovy
Groovy

Retrofunk Script

This 70s lettering font is inspired by retro and vintage advertising of the 70s. This 70s script font has a square ending to all the characters, giving it an even more casual vibe. The font includes an extruded version, so you can make your text pop off the background! 

Retrofunk Script retro font
Retrofunk Script

Punk Rock

The Xerox machine exploded in popularity in the 70s, making it easier to copy posters and flyers. Punk rock took off as a social movement against the political happenings of the decade. Revolutionary graphics with an explosive combination of text highlight the fact that there were no limits for artists. Punk rock graphics were loud and abrasive—similar to the tunes of the decade. 

Pop Punk Flyer

This pop punk flyer has a photocopied quality that takes you right back to the 70s. The Dada-style collage and xeroxed quality were staples in the punk rock scene of the decade. This poster includes a stylized 70s rock font that completes the highly saturated image. 

Pop Punk Flyer
Pop Punk Flyer

Punk Rock Music Event Flyer

Another great example of the 70s gig poster. The mix of multiple 70s rock fonts and black and white imagery, alongside the layout, makes for a visually compelling flyer.

Punk Rock Music Event Flyer
Punk Rock Music Event Flyer

Other 70s-Inspired Add-Ons

70s Retro Text Effects

The 70s were filled with iconic text effects. If you are looking to stylize your design, search no more! This add-on is perfect to go on any 70s groovy font or 70s disco font. It’ll instantly take you back in time.

70s Retro Text Effects
70s Retro Text Effects

Disco Retro Lines

Nothing screams vintage 70s font like neon style. This awesome set of wallpaper is a great collection to have in your arsenal. These attractive, retro and funky backgrounds are the perfect minimalist templates for your designs.

Disco Retro Lines disco font
Disco Retro Lines

Back to the Seventies

Inspired by magazines from the 70s, this is the ultimate pack you need. It includes patterns, brushes, and textures to apply to your design. Feel free to extrude titles, apply textures, and use brushes to obtain that vintage quality in your design.

Back to the Seventies
Back to the Seventies

Show Us Your 70s Designs!

The 70s were filled with many cultural movements that influenced graphic design in one way or another. Whether it was the use of colors, illustration style, or font shapes, the 70s were a decade to remember. If you are a fan of the funky and groovy 70s, then show us your work! Let us know about your favorite style from this era. 

Final product image

How to Create Halftone Effects in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Halftones are dots of varying sizes and spacing, put together to simulate a tone or gradient. Though it is a method connected to print, the aesthetics of it have made it popular to use even for digital content.

Having read a lot of comics where halftones are used, I have a special love for it that I hope to share with you in this tutorial. You will find that it is not so hard to create this effect in Adobe Illustrator, and by using halftones instead of regular black and white or grayscale gradients, you can give your comics and artwork a certain unique appeal.

45 Halftones Pattern

1. How to Create the Line Art

Step 1

We first need to create the artwork which the halftones will be applied to. I’ve made a sketch of a shocked woman, as a reference to pop art, which many associate halftones with.

I open a new document in Adobe Illustrator and import the sketch by going to File > Place…

From there I double-click the current layer the sketch is placed on, check the Template box and press OK. I won’t be working with many of them for this one, but naming your layers is always a good practice.

Template layer for sketch

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Step 2

Now I start inking the loose sketch with the Brush Tool. As usual, I like to use my comic style custom brush , but go with your own preference on what brush you use. You can find tips and tricks on creating various brush types here at Envato Tuts+, or you can check out some of the vector brush packs available on Envato Market.

Ink on top of sketch

Step 3

I like to make pretty loose sketches and do the real defining during the inking process. I find that a lot of the energy from the sketch can get lost when inking it, so my method is to not put too much effort into the sketch, and use it as more of a rough guide than a precise map to follow.

I have differed from the sketch in a lot of places, but now I feel it has the energy behind the expression just right, and it is ready for the next step.

Finished line art

2. Adding Shades of Gray

Use the Pen Tool to create the shapes of the hair. Make two shapes, one for each of the sides the hair is parted into. To get a gradient in black and white, simply press the Period keyon your keyboard.

Start filling in the lineart with grays

Once the hair is done, I add the shapes for the lips and irises as well. Since her hair is covering part of her face, I add a large shadow underneath the big lock of hair.

Gradient tool used for hair lips and eyes

When shading the skin, I try to keep in mind where the light source is coming from in the picture—from the left in this case—and try to break the shapes down that way. To add to the shock of the expression, I add extra shadow underneath the eyes, which can have a scary effect.

When shading the tongue, I make a dark to medium gray object with the Pen Tool, and then I add points of lighter gray with the Mesh Tool.

Mesh tool used for tongue

A good way to keep control over the overall look of your image is to make a grayscale palette from which you pick your colors. By limiting yourself to just a few shades, you minimize the risk of having it look chaotic and overworked.

Grayscale pallette

3. Time to Make Halftones!

Now we have a pretty decent grayscale image, but we want to have it in halftones. This part is easy, but a little demanding as well. While turning an object into grayscale is simply a push of a button, getting the desired look requires the right settings.

Which settings are best to use depends on what type of image you’re after and what size and resolution you are working in. In other words, it requires some trial and error.

Skin

I start by selecting all the objects making up the skin shading. Having these selected, I go to the Effect menu and choose Pixelate, then Color Halftone. Even though it says “Color Halftone” I recommend starting out creating these in black and white, simply because it’s easier to just keep track of how those two colors behave. Making halftones in color involves several colors blending, and the results can be trickier to manipulate.

Halftone settings

My image is not very big, so the settings I decide to use have pretty low values, which creates a nice dense pattern for the skin.

Halftone result

Hair

For the hair I want something a bit bolder, and I turn the values up a bit.

Halftone settings

Here you can really see how the dots work, becoming smaller the lighter the gradient becomes.

Halftone result

Mouth

Finally, for the mouth, I decide to experiment a bit more with the values of the mesh before applying the halftone.

Halftone settings
Halftone result

4. Use Dot Swatches for the Background

Besides creating the halftone effect yourself, Illustrator also offers some ready swatches to use. You can find them by going to Windows > Open Swatch Library > Patterns > Basic Graphics > Basic Graphics_Dots.

This will provide you with a selection of plain grays and gradients in halftone. While they may not be as flexible as making your own, they are quick and easy to use, and will make a good background for our image.

Dot pattern swatches

Awesome Work, You’re Done!

Creating halftones is not very hard in Illustrator, but they can be a bit fickle still. For example, you might notice their appearance can change unsatisfactorily when scaling. The best approach is to apply halftones to an image that is already in its final size. That way you won’t have unpleasant surprises when you export the image.

You might spend some extra time tweaking the settings to get the perfect density of dots, but adding halftones can be a good way to shake up your grayscale artwork. Especially with all the resources available, there are several ways to approach this type of style as well. For example, you might feel more comfortable creating halftones with brushes. If so, then this Halftone Brush pack from Envato Market might be of interest to you.

Finished result